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Acute Grief and Loss Management 1.00 Online
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Description

SUMMARY
Offers definitions, examples, stage model, and common symptoms of grief and loss, as well as coping with acute grief, family reactions, body viewing, and the death notification process. 



An Intraoperative Disaster: Responding to Adverse Outcomes in Anesthesiology 1.00 Online
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Description Learning Objectives Faculty
It was to have been a routine surgery to remove a ureteral stone from a patient in good overall health. Would you have known what to do in the face of the unexpected complications that developed?
 
The case discussed in this 1-hour webinar really happened, both in the operating room and in the courtroom. Anesthesiologist Eric Stoler draws on his experience reviewing malpractice claims to guide you through the dos and don’ts of responding to a bad outcome. From what to say to the patient and family, to resources for personal and professional support, this webinar gives you the key communication and documentation skills that can prevent a lawsuit or otherwise bolster your defense. You will leave the course feeling assured and empowered if an adverse outcome does occur.
Participants who complete this course will be able to:
  • Cite three steps they should take immediately after learning of an adverse outcome.
  • Describe documentation practices important to defending a malpractice claim.
  • Describe appropriate communication with the patient/family after an unexpected outcome.
  • Discuss ways to build resiliency in the aftermath of an adverse outcome.
Eric Stoler, MD—Anesthesiologist, Vancouver, WA
Dr. Stoler is currently in private practice with Columbia Anesthesia Group in Southwest Washington. He has served on the board of the Washington State Society for Anesthesia and has worked for several years on the Claims Committee for Physicians Insurance A Mutual Company in Seattle, WA.



Balancing Risk with the Noncompliant Patient: Tools and Techniques to Promote Accountability and Improve Documentation 1.00 Online
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Description Learning Objectives Faculty
This 1-hour webinar offers a practical approach to managing care of patients who don't follow treatment instructions. Accountability tools combined with behavior modification strategies will help you to shift the balance of responsibility and negotiate reasonable goals. The course illustrates ways to phrase questions to elicit information without lengthening the office visit. The course was planned and produced in accordance with the Accreditation Council of Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) criteria, with input from risk management and liability claims professionals.
Following the estimated one-hour completion time of this self-study course, physicians will be able to:
  • Cite at least three examples of noncompliant behavior that should be documented.
  • Describe the PABRC process of informed consent.
  • Use accountability tools such as a Patient Care Agreement Form to educate patients.
  • List four strategies to address noncompliance.
David McGrath, a Healthcare Risk Management Consultant at Physicians Insurance with 18 years of experience, provides advice and guidance to policyholders regarding health care risk management issues. Based in the Seattle office, David provides risk management services primarily in Western Washington.


Building Care Teams and Establishing Checkpoints: Asthma and COPD 1.00 Online
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Description
Building care teams in primary care has many benefits including improved patient outcomes for patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The care team can utilize certain checkpoints specific to these diseases that will help with managing their health. This course will focus on how to build care teams and utilize checkpoints to better assist your patients with asthma and COPD.


Building Care Teams and Establishing Checkpoints: Depression/Anxiety 1.00 Online
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Description
Chronic conditions are among the most common, and costly, of health problems, but that does not mean there are not effective means of coping or treatment options. In addition to prescribing proper diet, exercise, and pharmaceutical treatments, healthcare providers may also form clinical care teams to best manage patients suffering from these conditions. This module will discuss care teams, check points, and how to best assist patients in coordinating their care with other providers as it relates to anxiety and depression.


Cardiac Catheterization: Complications and Common Mistakes 1.00 Online
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Description
This is the last presentation and in six part webinar series. This program is for both new staff in the cardiac catheterization lab and for the more experienced staff to prepare for the RCIS examination. The program is comprehensive, beginning with a review of the anatomy and physiology, the basic and more advanced waveform analysis, the identification of shunts and the treatment modality. This program reviews the right heart catheterization, left heart catheterization, and interventional equipment descriptions and uses. The differentiation of coronary balloons, wires, and stents will be discussed. Commonly used cardiac medications are reviewed along with their effects and side effects.


Causes and Consequences: Malpractice Issues in Radiology 1.00 Online
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Description Learning Objectives Faculty
In the ever-changing world of medicine, expectations are increasing, and tolerance for error is diminishing. Not surprisingly, failure to diagnose is the most common claim against radiologists— 14.83 claims per 100 person-years. Error traps need to be uncovered and highlighted: documentation concerns in electronic medical records, communication issues between providers, and calling unexpected findings. Additionally, how do we determine the relationship between practice guidelines and standards of care?

In this 1-hour webinar, Dr. Jeffrey Robinson will help radiologists better understand what types of errors are being made. He will also provide tools and technology strategies to help prioritize findings and improve documentation and communication between referring providers. The net effect, ultimately, is to provide better, safer care to patients.
At the conclusion of this webinar, participants will be able to:
  • List the four classifications of error in radiology.
  • Employ the UW Critical Results Outline to better prioritize critical findings.
  • Describe one technology strategy they will use to improve communication with referring physicians.
Jeffrey Robinson, MD, Acting Assistant Professor of Radiology, University of Washington received an AB from Washington University in St. Louis, MD from the University of Minnesota, and MBA from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He completed his residency in diagnostic radiology at UCLA and fellowships in Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology at UCLA and Emergency Radiology at the University of Washington. He practiced in the private setting for 17 years and is currently Assistant Professor of Radiology at the University of Washington. He has been consulted as an expert witness for over 15 years. In 2012, he started Clear Review to address the problem of expert witness bias in radiology litigation.



Clinical Express: Pain Management Responsibilities 1.00 Online
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Description
Learn about how to implement a pain management program that includes non-pharmacological interventions as well as analgesics.


Cultural Diversity 1.00 Online
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Description

SUMMARY
Discusses culture, ethnicity, race, and cultural diversity; bias, prejudices, and stereotyping and avoiding them; and areas of cultural diversity and respecting cultural diversity.



Current Issues in Health Care Risk Management 1.00 Online
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Description Learning Objectives Faculty
This 1-hour e-learning module was planned and produced in accordance with the Accreditation Council of Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) Essentials. It includes reading material and recommendations for minimizing liability related to evolving issues such as:
  • Supervising midlevel providers
  • Treating minors in accordance with state law
  • Defining a patient-physician partnership when prescribing opioids
  • Participating in the State Prescription Drug Monitoring Program
  • Knowing your responsibilities associated with the Death with Dignity Act
  • Understanding the reporting requirements to the Department of Motor Vehicles
  • Handling patient requests for medical marijuana
  • Responding to a malpractice claim


Following completion, you will be able to:
  • Describe the supervisory responsibilities related to midlevel providers.
  • List the types of care to which a 13-year-old is legally entitled to consent.
  • Cite the issues that should be covered by an informed consent document for pain management therapy.
  • List the criteria for patient participation in Oregon’s and Washington State’s Death with Dignity Act.
Kathy Ferris, ARM, CPHRM, is a Healthcare Risk Management Consultant with Physicians Insurance. Working out of the Seattle Office, Kathy provides risk management services to members from Bellingham to Olympia. She has been a part of the Physicians Insurance Risk Management Department since 1998, helping to meet member needs with information, advice, and guidance regarding health care risk management issues.

Becky Fahey, RN, MPA:HA, CPHRM, is the  Senior Healthcare Risk Management Consultant based out of the Physicians Insurance office in Portland, Oregon. Prior to joining Physicians Insurance in 2011, Becky worked in the management of risk and claims issues related to medical malpractice for 10 years.


Don't Leave Me Standing Here Alone: Making the Case for Peer Support 1.00 Online
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Description Learning Objectives Faculty
A recent study reports that one out of every three medical providers will experience an adverse patient safety event this year. When a mistake results in patient injury, members of the care team suffer physically and emotionally. Even a near miss may negatively affect the ability to function at full competence. Learn what you can do to help a colleague return to delivery of confident patient care, and to implement a peer support program where you work.
At the completion of this self-study activity, providers will be able to:
  • Recognize and describe the multi-system impact of an adverse medical outcome.
  • Cite the components of a peer support program.
  • Access appropriate support when involved in an adverse event.
  • Administer emotional first aid to peers.


Jo Shapiro, MD, directs the Center for Professionalism and Peer Support at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. She is Associate Professor of Otology and Laryngology at Harvard Medical School, and is on the faculty of the Harvard Leadership Development for Physicians and Scientists. Dr. Shapiro was one of the first female division chiefs at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and she is on the Senior Advisory Board for the Office of Women’s Careers at BWH.






Empowering Patients: Tools for Effective Partnership and Behavior Change 1.00 Online
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Description Learning Objectives Faculty
“I run out of breath just walking to the bus stop,” says Michelle. “It’s been like that ever since I started on the diabetes pill. I’m fed up with that pill!”
 
She’s been your patient for years, but time never allows for a conversation about her climbing weight or aversion to checking blood sugar levels. Now you notice that her hypertension is also edging into the danger zone.
 
This 1-hour video course demonstrates how Michelle can be engaged as an active participant in her care within the timeframe of a regular office visit. You’ll learn motivation techniques by observing them in the patient interview, and ways to reduce your frustration with challenging patients. See how the patient-provider partnership can develop into an essential process to improve outcomes and reduce costs.


“We are entering a time of great challenge and major change in health care delivery and financing. In such an environment, health care leaders, physicians, and other providers in the trenches must rethink old models and find new ways to achieve their goals.”
 
“Self-efficacious patients represent a potentially major new resource, and the patient-provider partnership an important vehicle, for improving health care outcomes and controlling costs.”

At the conclusion of this course, participants will be able to:
  • Use patient-centered communication to establish a successful therapeutic connection.
  • Implement at least three strategies for fostering a collaborative patient relationship.
  • Use appreciative inquiry to identify and resolve barriers patients face to following a treatment plan.
  • Describe two ways they will involve other providers and office staff with helping patients follow the treatment plan.
Baruch Roter, MD is a family physician who teaches patient-centered care to medical students and medical residents as a Clinical Associate Professor at the University of Washington School of Medicine. He worked for 25 years in a community health center and has taught internationally since 2007 to help clinicians and the general public live and work with greater ease and happiness. More information on his offerings can be accessed through HeartfulHealer.com.



EMR Risks for Urologists: Enhancing Patient Safety and Minimizing Liability Risk 1.00 Online
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Description Learning Objectives Faculty
The electronic medical record can be a great ally in patient safety and care coordination—or it can expose lapses in critical communication and overwhelm you with conflicting data. This one-hour module gives you practical guidelines for using the EMR to your best advantage. It includes urology-specific case examples of how to manage alerts and macros, how to steer around pitfalls, and how to ensure agreement between different parts of the record.
 
Part I is presented by a national authority in urology, Carl Olsson, MD. Part II expands upon Dr. Olsson’s case examples with an interview between board-certified urologist Kathleen Latino, MD and top trial lawyer Elizabeth Leedom. Both components show you how to improve patient care and bolster your defense in the event of a malpractice claim.

Originally published in 2014, updated malpractice data and codes have been added to the course downloads.
At the conclusion of this webinar, participants will be able to:
  • Summarize the extent of malpractice claims and payments in urologic practice.
  • Cite the most common liability pitfalls related to use of the EMR.
  • Describe examples of disconnects between parts of the EMR.
  • Implement recommendations of the proper use of EMR to decrease practice liability.
Carl A Olsson MD, FACS, is the chief medical officer for Integrated Medical Professionals, operating in the greater New York Metropolitan area. He has served as president of the American Board of Urology, the Society of University Urologists, the Society of Urologic Oncology, the Clinical Society of Genitourinary Surgeons, and the New York Section of the American Urological Association and is presently president of the American Association of Genitourinary Surgeons.

He is a fellow of the American College of Surgeons and the New York Academy of Medicine. He is a member of several associations and societies including the American Association of Clinical Urologists, the American Urological Association (honorary), the Urological Society of Australia and New Zealand (honorary), the American Association of Genitourinary Surgeons, the Clinical Society of Genitourinary Surgeons and the American Surgical Association.

Dr. Olsson has authored more than 350 published books, book chapters and articles in scientific journals such as the Journal of Urology, Urology, Journal of Clinical Oncology, and New England Journal of Medicine.

Kathleen L. Latino, MD, FACS, has practiced adult urology in New York since July 1999. She considers herself a general urologist but has special areas of interest in stone disease and female voiding dysfunction. Dr. Latino received a BS from the University of Notre Dame. She received her MD from New York Medical College. She completed both a general surgery and urology residency from New York Medical College Medical Education Consortium. Dr. Latino has been a board certified member of the American Board of Urology since 1997. She is a member of the American Urological Association, American College of Surgeons, and Medical Society of the State of New York.
 


Elizabeth A. Leedom is an experienced trial lawyer in Seattle who has represented hospitals, physicians and other providers in medical malpractice cases for over 28 years. In addition to her work with health care providers, she has represented medical device and product manufacturers. Liz has tried over 60
malpractice cases to verdict. She is regularly included on the “Super Lawyers” list by Washington Law and Politics magazine.



HIPAA and CFR42 in the Emergency Department 1.00 Online
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Description
In an emergency department, information often flows amongst providers and patients quickly and as a result of urgent, sometimes life-threatening, situations. Due to the volume of information being shared, as well as the need for it to be shared quickly and accurately, emergency department providers must be especially careful to safeguard patient information. In this course, you will learn the basics of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and 42 CFR Part 2. While an overview of each law will be discussed, you will learn of specific information that you can and cannot share, how to share information appropriately, and what information you may not be able to access. Lastly, you will be presented with a few practical approaches for acquiring the information you need in a timely and efficient manner. The content in this course is based on information from HIPAA (US Department of Health and Human Services [USDHHS], 2014) and 42 CFR Part 2 (United States Government Publishing Office [USGPO], 2015). If you wish to view the law in its entirety, please see the References section at the end of the course. This course is intended for all emergency department personnel and providers. Please note that this course focuses on federal law. However, every state has its own privacy and confidentiality laws, and it is your responsibility to know your state’s laws and regulations. Furthermore, this course is not intended as legal advice for any individual provider or situation. If you need more comprehensive information, please review the resources listed at the end of this course and consult with your organization’s legal and compliance team.


HIPAA Do's and Don'ts: Electronic Communication and Social Media 1.00 Online
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Description
The use of electronic communications and social media allows users to instantly share pictures and personal messages with anyone, anywhere. But as the opportunities to share information online have increased, so have the challenges for keeping information private. The goal of this course is to make you more aware of social media’s privacy pitfalls and how to avoid them. During this course, you will be asked to make decisions on how to respond or communicate in specific situations. Your goal is to get through the course without committing a HIPAA violation. At the end of the course, your performance will be reviewed as well and the hypothetical consequences will be assigned based on how you responded. Do your best and good luck!


HIPAA Maintenance: Daily Habits for the Health Care Team 1.00 Online
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Description Learning Objectives Faculty
The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) became law in 1996. Nearly two decades later, the HIPAA Privacy and Security Rules remain challenging for many practices. In 2012 the Office for Civil Rights (OCR) of the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) completed an audit of 61 hospitals and clinics and found that 98% had at least one security finding or observation, that 80% did not have a complete and accurate risk assessment, and that in general, smaller clinics (10-50 providers) had a more difficult time addressing the requirements than did larger entities. Why do practices still struggle? 
 
The cost and effort in complying with the HIPAA regulations surpasses any immediate visible and tangible result. Unfortunately, we tend to put off prevention in favor of production, where working harder and faster seems to produce “more” visible results. This self-study course will help you understand some of the legal and technology terms, and help guide you through the broad and complicated rules to developing a day-to-day privacy and security compliance program.
At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:
  • Describe the process for conducting an "objective" risk assessment.
  • Cite one privacy and security practice as required by the HIPAA Final Rule that you will implement.
Robert Y. Oikawa, MD, MPH, CISSP, CPPS, CPHQ, has focused on the information security and safety of health care information technology, especially regarding HIPAA security and privacy. He has been involved with health care, security, safety, and quality improvement throughout his career. He received his MD degree from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 1979, completing his medical residency and fellowships in biomedical engineering, cardiology, and interventional cardiology at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. After a stint in private practice of interventional cardiology, he returned to software engineering and served as principal consultant, senior program manager, and senior architect during a decade with the Microsoft Corporation and MSNBC, focusing on software and system architecture, information security, learning solution development, software engineering best practices, risk management, innovation, and intellectual property.


HIPAA Maintenance: Document Control and Quality Improvement 1.00 Online
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Description Learning Objectives Faculty
Medical records are the legal record of care. Billing and accounting records are the heart of the clinic’s finances. HIPAA’s documentation requirements similarly address the privacy and information-security aspect of the practice. As the first step toward implementing safeguards specified in HIPAA’s Security Rule, the Department of Health and Human Services requires organizations to conduct a risk analysis. But what does a risk analysis entail, and what do you absolutely have to include in your report?

This 1-hour, on-line self-study course will discuss:
  • the role of written information-security policies and procedures
  • how keeping your documentation under control helps you ensure the protection of Protected Health Information (PHI)
  • prepares you for audits and investigations
  • how quality improvement methods can help you with HIPAA compliance
At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:
  • List the four standards and implementation specifications within HIPAA that spell out a covered entity's duty to monitor its compliance with the privacy and security rules. 
  • Cite one operational change affecting the security of electronic PHI that you will make.
Robert Y. Oikawa, MD, MPH, CISSP, CPPS, CPHQ, has focused on the information security and safety of health care information technology, especially regarding HIPAA privacy and security. He has been involved with health care, security, safety, and quality improvement throughout his career. He received his MD degree from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 1979, completing his medical residency and fellowships in biomedical engineering, cardiology, and interventional cardiology at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. After a stint in private practice of interventional cardiology, he returned to software engineering and served as principal consultant, senior program manager, and senior architect during a decade with the Microsoft Corporation and MSNBC, focusing on software and system architecture, information security, learning solution development, software engineering best practices, risk management, innovation, and intellectual property.


HIPAA Maintenance: Responding to a Breach 1.00 Online
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Description Learning Objectives Faculty
In our electronic world, breaches of PHI are inevitable, and the natural reaction is one of panic and uncertainty. Organizing and implementing breach notifications is stressful, burdensome, and expensive, and a breach may only be the presenting problem for more fundamental security issues. HIPAA’s Breach Notification Rule provides guidance by mapping out a plan of action.
 
Health-care organizations need to implement reasonable and appropriate safeguards that meet the practice’s environment and patient population. Use of the HIPAA Security Rule will put in place clear procedures to prevent, detect, contain, and correct security violations. This one-hour webinar will help bridge the gap between knowledge and implementation.
At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to
  • Define what is and is not a breach under the HIPAA Privacy Rule,
  • Describe the difference between “secured” and “unsecured” PHI, and
  • Cite one security-incident-response policy they will implement to manage a breach notification.
John R. Christiansen, Christiansen IT Law
Since the early 1990s, John R. Christiansen has been practicing law related to health-information technology. After practicing in major law and consulting firms, John formed Christiansen IT Law in 2005 to provide services on a more flexible, cost-effective basis. Christiansen IT Law’s services include privacy and security assessment, compliance and risk management, contracting and licensing of health information technology services, and related issues. Clients include health-care providers, technology and services vendors, government agencies, academic institutions, and professional firms.

John is an active participant in professional associations, including current service as Chair of the Washington State Bar Association Health Law Section, and past Chair of the American Bar Association’s HITECH Megarule Task Force. He frequently speaks and publishes on health information technology and is the author of An Integrated Standard of Care for Healthcare Information Security (AHLA 2005), The HITECH Business Associate Contracts Bible (ABA 2013) and Management of Health Information in Washington State: Federal and State Regulations (WSHIMA 2015), a recently published, comprehensive reconciliation of Washington State and federal health information privacy laws.


HIPAA Maintenance: Security Risk Assessment 1.00 Online
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Description Learning Objectives Faculty
Through its audit process, the Office for Civil Rights continues to find deficiencies in the way that medical practices handle HIPAA compliance programs. Theft or loss of unencrypted electronic systems and media containing protected health information is an ongoing problem. Cases continue to occur where patient records are left unprotected and where unauthorized access may be gained. Headlines of large penalties levied against health-care organizations for security breaches continue to populate the media.

The Department of Health and Human Services requires organizations to conduct a risk analysis as the first step toward implementing the safeguards specified in the HIPAA Security Rule and ultimately achieving HIPAA compliance.

What does a risk analysis entail, and what do you absolutely have to include in your report? This one-hour webinar will provide an overview of the scope and requirements of a security risk analysis, as well as resources to help you develop an organized, day-to-day security and privacy program.
At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:
  • List the elements that must be incorporated into an effective risk analysis
  • Cite one of the security measures they will implement as a result of the risk analysis
John R. Christiansen, Christiansen IT Law
Since the early 1990s, John R. Christiansen has been practicing law related to health-information technology. After practicing in major law and consulting firms, John formed Christiansen IT Law in 2005 to provide services on a more flexible, cost-effective basis.

Christiansen IT Law’s services include privacy and security assessment, compliance and risk management, contracting and licensing of health information technology services, and related issues. Clients include health-care providers, technology and services vendors, government agencies, academic institutions, and professional firms.

John is an active participant in professional associations, including current service as Chair of the Washington State Bar Association Health Law Section, and past Chair of the American Bar Association’s HITECH Megarule Task Force. He frequently speaks and publishes on health information technology and is the author of An Integrated Standard of Care for Healthcare Information Security (AHLA 2005), The HITECH Business Associate Contracts Bible (ABA 2013) and Management of Health Information in Washington State: Federal and State Regulations (WSHIMA 2015), a recently published, comprehensive reconciliation of Washington State and federal health information privacy laws.


HIPAA Privacy 1.00 Online
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Description
All persons have the right to have their health information protected from unauthorized access. To do so, healthcare organizations must follow a specific HIPAA rule, known as the Privacy Rule. It limits the situations in which they can use and disclose protected health information, known as PHI. To maintain compliance with HIPAA, all employees must follow the requirements of the Privacy Rule by guarding PHI from unauthorized use and disclosure. In this course, the learner will learn about the Privacy Rule and ways to prevent breaches.


HIPAA Security 1.00 Online
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Description
The use of technology has bloomed in the healthcare industry. While its use has improved the delivery and continuity of care, it increases the chance that an unauthorized person will be able to access individual’s protected health information, or PHI. Therefore, to protect electronic PHI, or e-PHI, your organization is required to follow a specific HIPAA rule, known as the Security Rule. To maintain compliance with HIPAA, all healthcare workers must follow the requirements of the Security Rule. In this course, the learner will learn about the Security Rule and ways they can prevent breaches.


HIPAA: The Basics 1.00 Online
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Description
The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) protects the confidentiality and security of healthcare information. HIPAA creates and protects individual privacy rights for protected health information and governs the use and disclosure of that information.


How Risky Is Your EHR? Improving Patient Safety 1.00 Online
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Description Learning Objectives Faculty
Strong patient records strike a balance between structured data (data readable by a computer) and narrative information; maintaining this balance can be challenging. While electronic health records (EHRs) show promise for long-term quality improvement in health care, it’s clear they are not a panacea for patient safety problems in the short run, and may initially contribute to patient safety events. There is growing evidence that a variety of EHR-related patient safety events occur frequently, including:
  • User errors such as wrong patient, wrong field, wrong time, or failure to finalize transaction,
  • misreading or misinterpreting displayed information, and
  • providers incorrectly accepting default values when entering orders.
 
This 1-hour e-learning module will discuss some of the most frequently occurring EHR patient safety events and will provide strategies you can implement to mitigate those risks.
At the conclusion of this e-learning activity, you should be able to:
  • Describe the most common types of EHR patient safety events.
  • List the most frequently occurring EHR patient safety events.
  • Identify EHR patient safety events in your practice.
  • Implement risk strategies to minimize the risk of EHR patient safety events.
Kathy Ferris, ARM, CPHRM, is a Healthcare Risk Management Consultant with Physicians Insurance. Working out of the Seattle Office, Kathy provides risk management services to members from Bellingham to Olympia. She has been a part of the Physicians Insurance Risk Management Department since 1998, helping to meet member needs with information, advice, and guidance regarding health care risk management.



Images of Liability: Risk Management in Radiology 1.00 Online
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Description Learning Objectives Faculty
This course is intended to diminish the gap between best practice and common practice for radiologists in the areas of communication, documentation, and informed consent. Communication failures are among the top reasons that patients sue. An analysis of national as well as Physicians Insurance claims reveals that a significant number of lawsuits are lost or settled on the basis of poor communication, incomplete documentation, or a deficient process of informed consent. National trends point increasingly to liability associated with electronic medical records.

This 1-hour e-learning module was planned and produced in accordance with the Accreditation Council of Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) Essentials. It includes reading material related to malpractice claims in which radiologists are named as defendants, the impact of teleradiology, informed consent, and communication issues.
Following completion, you will be able to:
  • Implement a policy for communication of diagnostic imaging findings based upon the American College of Radiology guideline.
  • Cite each step in the PABRC process of informed consent.
  • Describe two liability risks associated with the use of an electronic medical record.
  • List three strategies for increasing patient compliance in regard to recommended tests.
Cathy Reunanen, ARM, CPHRM, is a Senior Healthcare Risk Management Consultant with Physicians Insurance. With more than 30 years of experience in the health care field, she provides site reviews, consultative services, and risk management education for health care providers and medical office staff throughout Washington State. Cathy is an active member of the American Society for Healthcare Risk Management and the Washington Health Care Risk Management Society.


Importance of Integrating Debriefing Skills in Nursing Professional Development 1.00 Online
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Description

SUMMARY

Describes the challenges in higher nursing education, research findings related to the effectiveness of utilizing simulations in nursing, concepts which are essential in the debriefing process, and how to guide reflection during the debriefing process. 

Debriefing techniques encourage critical reflection, and are essential in all educational settings, including classroom, clinical, and patient care settings. The process of understanding why an action was taken requires critically reflecting upon the situation, allowing an individual to incorporate past learning experiences with the current situation. Despite the importance of debriefing, research has shown that use of debriefing models are lacking in nursing education, as well as formal debriefing training and competency assessment. This program discusses simulation and debriefing in the nursing profession, essential debriefing concepts, and effectively guiding critical reflection to enhance learning. 



Incident Reporting 1.00 Online
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Description
This course describes current accepted practice related to the prevention and reporting of incidents in behavioral health settings. Interactive exercises, helpful vignettes, and informative guidelines on disclosure of serious incidents will aid you in implementing this material at your own job. After completing this course, you will have the tools and knowledge needed to effectively prevent and/or report incidents.


Informed Consent: More Than Just a Form 1.00 Online
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Description Learning Objectives Faculty
National data indicates that more than one-third of all malpractice claims and lawsuits allege a failure to obtain informed consent. The truth is patients are not as informed as physicians think. A recent study showed that actually only 40 percent of patients think the informed consent they signed reflects their actual understanding of the procedure and its risks and benefits. Informed consent is a process, not just a piece of paper, and good informed consent practices have measurable benefits. Patients have a better understanding of the procedures and/or treatments proposed, improved patient satisfaction, improved patient compliance, and better clinical outcomes. This one-hour webinar will help physicians better understand informed consent as a process and its importance to both themselves and their patients.
At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to:
  • Describe the elements of informed consent and why informed consent is required.
  • Discuss the importance of informed consent to both patient and provider.
  • Create a “procedure specific” consent form for common procedures within the practice.
  • Describe informed consent requirements when dealing with the “incompetent” patient and with minors.

David McGrath, a Healthcare Risk Management Consultant at Physicians Insurance with 18 years of experience, provides advice and guidance to policyholders regarding healthcare risk management issues. David is based in the Seattle office and provides risk management services primarily in Western Washington. 



Infusion of Culturally Responsive Practices 1.00 Online
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Description
As a healthcare professional, you have undoubtedly worked with individuals from many different cultures. However, you may or may not be aware of the impact that a person’s cultural diversity can have on overall health and well-being. In this course, you will learn how culturally-responsive practice can have a significantly positive effect on your service delivery. This training, designed for a variety of licensed professionals in a number of health and human service settings, introduces you to several assessment models to enhance your aptitude with individuals from a range of diverse backgrounds. It is worth noting that culture is always at play, regardless of the healthcare provider’s capacity to recognize and/or respond to it appropriately. In this course, you will review important barriers to treatment and ethical considerations important for culturally responsive care. Using detailed, real-life examples and interactive vignettes, you will end this course with a richer understanding of how to apply and infuse culturally responsive practices in your own healthcare organization. DSM™ and DSM-5™ are registered trademarks of the American Psychiatric Association. The American Psychiatric Association is not affiliated with nor endorses this course. This module is text-based.


Interviewing the Patient 1.00 Online
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Description
The patient interview is the most important part of your exam. Gaining the patient’s perspective and learning more about issues important to them can guide the healthcare provider in developing patient-specific care plans. This course will cover different techniques for the various types of patient interviews. You will learn interviewing methods to effectively elicit the important details about a patient's reason for presenting to the clinic. The seven things you need to know about almost every complaint will be covered, as well as how to approach the difficult patient. While there are many categories of difficult patients, several studies have shown that it is the provider that must adapt in order to complete the interview. You will learn how to adapt for several specific patient types: the histrionic, obsessive, self-defeating, borderline personality, and dependent types. This course will use a blend of didactic information, case studies, and self-evaluation to facilitate your learning experience. The target audience for this course is registered nurses and advanced practice nurses.


Intimate Partner (Domestic) Violence Part 2 1.00 Online
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Description

SUMMARY

Discusses how to assess and screen for intimate partner violence (IPV), treatment options, victim blaming, and self-care when working with IPV.



Language & Cross-Cultural Communication: Overcoming the Barriers 1.00 Online
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Description Learning Objectives Faculty
The Northwest is among the fastest growing areas in the country, with projected increases of diverse populations expected to reach up to 150 percent in the next 20 years. Effective cross-cultural health care involves a combination of communication skills and resources for providing appropriate services.

This 1-hour e-learning module was planned and produced in accordance with the Accreditation Council of Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) Essentials. It is intended to help you increase proficiency at communicating with culturally diverse patients and those with low health literacy.
Following the estimated one-hour completion time of this self-study course, you will be able to:
  • Assess your practice for cultural and linguistic competency.
  • Develop, implement, promote, and monitor a written plan outlining goals, policies, and procedures for providing culturally and linguistically appropriate services.
  • Develop and make available easily understood patient-related materials, and post signage in the languages encountered in your service area.
Cathy Reunanen, ARM, CPHRM, is a Senior Healthcare Risk Management Consultant with Physicians Insurance. With more than 30 years of experience in the health care field, she provides site reviews, consultative services, and risk management education for health care providers and medical office staff throughout Washington State. Cathy is an active member of the American Society for Healthcare Risk Management and the Washington Health Care Risk Management Society.


Language & Cross-Culture Communication: Overcoming the Barriers 1.00 Online
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Description Learning Objectives Faculty
The Northwest is among the fastest growing areas in the country, with projected increases of diverse populations expected to reach up to 150 percent in the next 20 years. Effective cross-cultural health care involves a combination of communication skills and resources for providing appropriate services.

This 1-hour e-learning module was planned and produced in accordance with the Accreditation Council of Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) Essentials. It is intended to help you increase proficiency at communicating with culturally diverse patients and those with low health literacy.
Following the estimated one-hour completion time of this self-study course, you will be able to:
  • Assess your practice for cultural and linguistic competency.
  • Develop, implement, promote, and monitor a written plan outlining goals, policies, and procedures for providing culturally and linguistically appropriate services.
  • Develop and make available easily understood patient-related materials, and post signage in the languages encountered in your service area.
Cathy Reunanen, ARM, CPHRM, is a Senior Healthcare Risk Management Consultant with Physicians Insurance. With more than 30 years of experience in the health care field, she provides site reviews, consultative services, and risk management education for health care providers and medical office staff throughout Washington State. Cathy is an active member of the American Society for Healthcare Risk Management and the Washington Health Care Risk Management Society.


Managing Category II Fetal Heart Rate Patterns: A Standardized Approach 1.00 Online
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Description Learning Objectives Faculty
As an obstetrical practitioner, you know the challenges inherent in managing Category II fetal heart rate patterns during labor. Interpreting these tracings remains one of the most critical issues in obstetrics. We are pleased to announce a new tool that can help! A simple, rational, evidence-based algorithm will be presented by obstetrical patient safety leader Steven L. Clark, MD.

This webinar will explain and demonstrate the algorithm, which reflects a synthesis of medical evidence and current scientific thought. You will learn through examples of challenging fetal strips how to achieve compliance with the current standard of care in managing this difficult clinical situation.

Developed in conjunction with other leading experts, Dr. Clark will highlight his article just published in the August 2013 American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.
Obstetrical practitioners who complete this webinar will be able to:
  • Discuss the benefits of standardized interpretation of terminology and protocols for management of category II fetal heart rate patterns.
  • Review and discuss the proposed algorithm for the management of category II fetal heart rate tracings.
  • Apply the algorithm to Category II tracings.
Steven L. Clark, MD, is a maternal-fetal medicine specialist and is medical director of Women’s and Children’s Clinical Services for the Hospital Corporation of America. He was formerly professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Utah. He has served as president of the Society for Maternal Fetal Medicine, chair of the ACOG Technical Bulletin Committee, and a board examiner. He has served on several ACOG task forces and committees, and as patient safety consultant to the U.S. Air Force Surgeon General. He currently serves on the Scientific Advisory Board for United Health Care and on the Joint Commission Perinatal Advisory Panel. He has published over 200 scientific articles and chapters, and he has edited several textbooks, including Critical Care Obstetrics. He serves as a peer reviewer for 23 national and international scientific journals.


Mock Trial: Copycat Documentation Part 1 1.00 Online
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Description

SUMMARY

Discussion of the importance of proper and thorough documentation of all patient care provided, the risks associated with drag and drop charting in the electronic medical record (EMR), and the importance of effective communication within the healthcare team to prevent adverse patient outcomes.

In the healthcare sector, effective teamwork and communication are essential in order to provide safe and effective care, and ineffective communication is a major cause of errors and adverse outcomes in patient care. Communication errors may occur on many occasions, including patient handover between nurses, which may lead to differing perceptions of a situation and incorrect treatment. In addition to verbal communication, healthcare staff also rely heavily on patient information documented in the patient’s electronic medical record (EMR) in order to ensure patient safety and continuity of care. Documentation facilitates real-time communication within the healthcare team, and when documentation is incomplete or inaccurate, patient safety may be jeopardized due to misinformation and subsequent incorrect treatment. According to the Joint Commission, it is documented in literature that there is widespread use of the copy and paste function (CPF) by healthcare professionals when documenting in the EMR. While using the CPF does have its benefits, these benefits must be compared to the multiple risks in order to preserve the integrity of the medical record. With increasing widespread use of the EMR, the potential for patient harm and adverse outcomes is increased. This program presents the negative consequences which occurred as a result of miscommunication and inappropriate documentation, with the goal of educating healthcare professionals regarding how critical it is to communicate effectively and document thoroughly in order to achieve best patient outcomes.



Mock Trial: Copycat Documentation Part 2 1.00 Online
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Description

SUMMARY

Discussion of the importance of proper and thorough documentation of all patient care provided, the risks associated with drag and drop charting in the electronic medical records (EMR), and the importance of effective communication within the healthcare team to prevent adverse patient outcomes.


In the healthcare sector, effective teamwork and communication are essential in order to provide safe and effective care, and ineffective communication is a major cause of errors and adverse outcomes in patient care. Communication errors may occur on many occasions, including patient handover between nurses, which may lead to differing perceptions of a situation and incorrect treatment. In addition to verbal communication, healthcare staff also rely heavily on patient information documented in the patient’s electronic medical record (EMR) in order to ensure patient safety and continuity of care. Documentation facilitates real-time communication within the healthcare team, and when documentation is incomplete or inaccurate, patient safety may be jeopardized due to misinformation and subsequent incorrect treatment. According to the Joint Commission, it is documented in literature that there is widespread use of the copy and paste function (CPF) by healthcare professionals when documenting in the EMR. While using the CPF does have its benefits, these benefits must be compared to the multiple risks in order to preserve the integrity of the medical record. With increasing widespread use of the EMR, the potential for patient harm and adverse outcomes is increased. This program presents the negative consequences which occurred as a result of miscommunication and inappropriate documentation, with the goal of educating healthcare professionals regarding how critical it is to communicate effectively and document thoroughly in order to achieve best patient outcomes.



No Perfect Answer: Partnering for a Shared Decision 1.00 Online
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Description Learning Objectives Faculty
Shared decision making and evidence-based medicine are both essential to quality health care, yet the interdependence between these two approaches is not generally appreciated. Doctors and patients should cooperate in a joint decision-making process that incorporates the doctor’s medical knowledge and the patient’s values and preferences. However, it is difficult for a physician to understand those values and preferences when the patient may not consciously understand them or be able to articulate them.
 
This is where the development of decision aids has helped. Resources such as booklets and videos demonstrate how a procedure is performed, what to expect during recovery, and how real people have adapted to prescribed treatments and procedures.
 
This one-hour course incorporates videos contrasting a patient visit using the traditional approach with the same visit using shared decision-making and decision aids. The course includes a dynamic presentation on the principles of shared decision-making by Dr. David Arterburn, a pioneer in research and use of decision aids.
Participants will leave this activity able to:
  • Apply best shared decision-making practices to improve patient engagement, as well as patient outcomes, safety, and satisfaction.
  • Employ shared decision-making strategies that take into account patient values, preferences, and circumstances.
  • List three legal documentation requirements of shared decision making in the medical record.
David Arterburn, MD, MPH, FACP, is a general internist and a health services researcher who holds positions as an Associate Investigator at the Group Health Research Institute and as an Affiliate Associate Professor with the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle. Dr. Arterburn has been awarded numerous federal and foundation grants and has published more than 80 scientific manuscripts in the areas of obesity and shared decision making. His current research covers a broad range, including comparative effectiveness of weight-management interventions, pharmacoepidemiology, and shared decision making related to elective surgery. For the past decade, he has served as a medical editor for the Informed Medical Decisions Foundation, where he has collaborated on the development, implementation, and evaluation of patient decision aids and provider-training programs to support shared decision making.


Opioid Use and Abuse Landscape 1.00 Online
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Description
Opioid use and abuse has become a significant problem within the United States. Each year, more and more people die because of an opioid overdose. It has become an epidemic and healthcare, government, and other organizations are taking steps to combat the problem. As a healthcare provider, you play a critical role in addressing the opioid epidemic. This course will provide an overview of the opioid use and abuse landscape as it exists in our country today. It is geared toward healthcare providers in behavioral health, ambulatory or pre-acute care, emergency department, and urgent care.


Patient Complaints and Service Recovery: Strategies for Successfully Handling Customer Satisfaction Issues 1.00 Online
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Description Learning Objectives Faculty
Poor communication can damage a patient's confidence in the interest, competence, and attitude of the health care team. When confidence is undermined, any complication or adverse result can lead to a complaint and if the complaint is not handled appropriately, litigation can result. This one-hour webinar will address the issues that lead to patient dissatisfaction and will present strategies to prevent the errors that result from communication failures.
At the conclusion of this webinar, participants should be able to:
  • Review and discuss strategies to effectively and confidently address and resolve patient/family complaints.
  • Identify trends and patterns that precipitate patient/family complaints in order to develop appropriate action plans.
Leslie Moore, RN, JD, CPHRM, is a Senior Healthcare Risk Management Consultant with Physicians Insurance. She is based in the Eastern Regional Office and provides risk management services throughout Central and Eastern Washington and Idaho. She has more than 15 years’ experience in the health care risk management and compliance field working with rural and large urban hospitals, small physician practices, and large multispecialty clinics to promote patient safety.


Prescription Monitoring: Time-saving Strategies for Using a Life-saving Resource 1.00 Online
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Description Learning Objectives Faculty
A CDC report released in mid-2014 details a continuing upswing in overdose deaths from prescription pain killers in the U.S.—with the greatest increase in 55-to-65 year-olds! Why is this epidemic continuing? What is your role as a physician in curbing it?

Your state Prescription Monitoring Program (PMP) offers an essential answer. Enhanced technology has made for much easier use in the course of a busy day! This one-hour live webinar will show you how the PMP fits into the context of a thoughtful care plan, and how your office staff can facilitate the process. You’ll get pointers on talking with patients to gain their acceptance and increase rapport.
Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to:
  • Introduce the Prescription Monitoring Program into their overall care plan for patients with chronic pain.
  • Enroll devices that facilitate access to the Prescription Monitoring Program.
  • Use their office staff to facilitate access to patient history reports.
Michael Schiesser, MD, Internal Medicine, Bellevue, is a widely accomplished and respected physician leader. He is a national expert in issues of pain care, addiction medicine, and evolving standards of care in clinical delivery involving controlled substances. His patient advocacy resulted in changes in Washington State Law, State licensing commission rules, and a Pulitzer Prize winning collaboration with the Seattle Times.
 
Dr. Schiesser has authored and delivered pain and addiction related education to thousands of physicians across the United States. His areas of expertise include laboratory industry, regulatory policy, health administration, and legislative affairs.

Chris Baumgartner is Director of the Prescription Monitoring Program at the Department of Health.  He serves on the Prescription Monitoring Information Exchange Architecture Governance Body and the S&I Framework for PMP Interoperability with Electronic Health Records. He is also involved with the Department of Health’s Unintentional Poisonings Workgroup and the Agency Medical Director’s Opioid Dosing Guideline. He has presented at numerous local and national conferences including the past two years at the National Rx Drug Abuse Summit. Throughout his tenure with public health, Mr. Baumgartner has played an active role in a variety of initiatives to promote patient safety and help prevent prescription drug overdose and misuse.


Preterm Labor & Preterm Premature Rupture of Membranes 1.00 Online
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Description

SUMMARY

Discussion of preterm labor and birth including current terminology, the implications of preterm birth, the risk factors associated with preterm labor and preterm premature rupture of membranes, the signs and symptoms of preterm labor, management strategies and nursing interventions for preterm labor and preterm premature rupture of membranes, and risks to the mother and fetus associated with preterm labor and preterm premature rupture of membranes.


Preterm birth occurs in approximately 12% of all live births in the United States and is the leading cause of neonatal mortality, responsible for 70% of newborn deaths and 36% of infant deaths. In addition to mortality, preterm births are responsible for 25-50% of cases of long-term neurologic impairment in children, as well as other serious health problems. 50% of preterm live births are preceded by the woman experiencing preterm labor. For approximately 30% of these women, preterm labor will resolve on its own. However, evaluation and management of these individuals are crucial in order to delay childbirth until the fetus has developed appropriately and is ready for delivery. This program discusses preterm labor and birth, including risk factors, signs and symptoms, diagnostic evaluation, maternal and fetal risks, and management strategies.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
After completing this activity, registered nurses will be able to discuss best practices in the assessment and management of preterm labor and birth, including risk factors, signs and symptoms, diagnostic evaluation, maternal and fetal risks, and management strategies.



Privacy and Confidentiality for Non-HIPAA Covered Entities 1.00 Online
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Description
You work for an organization that provides housing and a variety of services to many individuals. As part of your responsibilities, you will come in contact with and need to communicate personal information about those individuals. You are responsible for protecting the privacy and confidentiality of all individuals’ personal information.


Quick and Effective Strategies for Engaging Family Members in Treatment 1.00 Online
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Description
Recent research and healthcare reform efforts highlight the central importance of engaging patients and their families in treatment as a key factor in improving patient outcomes. In family-centered care, collaborative relationships between healthcare providers and the patient’s family members are emphasized for their benefits to quality care. In contrast, lack of engagement of the patient and their family members in treatment is associated with inadequately addressed existing health problems, the emergence of new health issues, treatment complications, medical errors, deaths, disability, and more frequent use of high-cost services such as emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations, versus preventive and routine care. This course will provide an Recent research and healthcare reform efforts highlight the central importance of engaging patients and their families in treatment as a key factor in improving patient outcomes. In family-centered care, collaborative relationships between healthcare providers and the patient’s family members are emphasized for their benefits to quality care. In contrast, lack of engagement of the patient and their family members in treatment is associated with inadequately addressed existing health problems, the emergence of new health issues, treatment complications, medical errors, deaths, disability, and more frequent use of high-cost services such as emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations, versus preventive and routine care. This course will provide an overview of strategies you can use to engage your patient’s family members in treatment in order to promote greater follow through with discharge recommendations from the ED, and reduce high utilization of costly treatment approaches.


Quick and Effective Strategies for Engaging Patients in Treatment 1.00 Online
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Description
Recent research and healthcare reform efforts highlight the central importance of engaging patients in treatment as a key factor in improving patient outcomes. The high costs of patient lack of engagement include inadequately addressed existing health problems, the emergence of new health issues, non-adherence to medication regimens, medical errors, deaths, disability, and more frequent use of high-cost services such as emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations, versus preventive and routine care. This course will provide an overview of strategies you can use to engage patients in treatment prior to their discharge from the ED, to promote greater follow through with discharge recommendations, and reduce high utilization of costly treatment approaches.


Recapturing the Basics: Risk Management Essentials for Medical Practices 1.00 Online
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Description Learning Objectives Faculty
This course is intended to diminish the gap between best practice and common practice in the areas of communication, documentation, and informed consent. Communication failures are among the top reasons that patients sue. An analysis of national as well as Physicians Insurance claims reveals a significant number of lawsuits lost or settled on the basis of poor communication, incomplete documentation, or a deficient process of informed consent. National trends point increasingly to liability associated with electronic medical records and mobile devices.

This 1-hour e-learning module was planned and produced in accordance with the Accreditation Council of Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) Essentials. It includes reading material related to basic risk management issues in medical practice: communication among providers, physician-patient communication, documentation recommendations, informed consent issues, and the risks/benefits posed by electronic medical records.
Following the estimated one-hour completion time of this self-study course, physicians will be able to
  • List criteria for documenting telephone calls.
  • Describe three strategies for working with elderly patients.
  • Describe two strategies for working with challenging patients.
  • Describe two liability risks associated with use of an electronic medical record.
  • Identify and describe two situations that may require the creation of notes outside of the medical record.
Kathy Ferris, ARM, CPHRM, is a Healthcare Risk Management Consultant at Physicians Insurance with 16 years of experience. Working out of the Seattle office, Kathy provides risk management services to members from Bellingham to Olympia. She has been a part of the Physicians Insurance Risk Management Department since 1998, helping to meet member needs with information, advice, and guidance regarding health care risk management issues.


Recognizing and Responding to Addiction During Chronic Pain Treatment with Opioids 1.00 Online
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Description Learning Objectives Faculty
Unintended deaths due to prescription drug overdose, not including drug-related suicides, continue to exceed deaths due to motor vehicle accidents. In 2009, nearly 1 million Americans reported using pain relievers nonmedically for 200 days or more. Many patients who obtain prescription opioids for nonmedical use typically receive their prescription from a physician, or indirectly from someone who is getting a prescription from a physician.

This one-hour e-learning module was planned and produced in accordance with the Accreditation Council of Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) Essentials. It will illustrate how to identify patients at risk for substance-abuse disorders, and what to do about it. It was first introduced in 2009 and has been updated to reflect changing standards and newer tools such as statewide Prescription Drug Monitoring programs.
Following the estimated one-hour completion time of this self-study course, physicians will be able to
  • Communicate expectations to patients who are receiving opioids for chronic pain treatment.
  • Cite the benefits of a state Prescription Drug Monitoring Program to assist with the monitoring of patients receiving opioids.
  • Incorporate utilization of the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program into the treatment plan.
  • Explain the technology associated with urine drug screening and incorporate it into the treatment plan.
  • Develop positive communication techniques during a variety of situations while prescribing opioids to patients with chronic pain. 
Michael Schiesser, MD, Internal Medicine, Bellevue
Diplomate, American Board of Addiction Medicine 
A widely accomplished and respected physician leader, Dr. Schiesser is a national expert in issues of pain care, addiction medicine, and evolving standards of care in clinical delivery involving controlled substances. His patient advocacy resulted in changes in Washington State law, state licensing commission rules, and a Pulitzer Prize-winning collaboration with the Seattle Times.
 
Dr. Schiesser has authored and delivered pain and addiction-related education to thousands of physicians across the United States. His areas of expertise include laboratory industry, regulatory policy, health administration, and legislative affairs. 


Risk Analysis of PHI Related to Stage II Meaningful Use 1.00 Online
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Description Learning Objectives Faculty
If your risk analysis covers only an examination of risks to your EHR, practice management system, and forms of technology you use on a day-to-day basis, then it is likely incomplete.

In today's climate, your risk analysis must cover risks that may impact your organization at all levels. This includes administrative, physical, and technical risks to all PHI, as well as critical business processes. While the HIPAA Security Rule focuses only on electronic PHI, the HIPAA Privacy Rule includes language requiring you to protect PHI in any form.

This webinar assists you in developing a plan to conduct your risk analysis on a periodic basis, inventory your assets, determine what can harm you and your patients, and identify controls that protect you and your patients. We will also cover prioritizing risks, developing mitigation plans, and documenting risks that are acceptable to your organization.
After completion of this course, participants will be able to:
  1. Employ a written policy and procedure defining how their practice conducts a periodic risk analysis
  2. Conduct a risk analysis and document results.

Chris Apgar, CISSP, CEO, and president of Apgar & Associates, LLC and former HIPAA compliance officer for Providence Health Plans, is a nationally recognized information security, privacy, HIE & HIPAA/HITECH expert. Mr. Apgar is a member of the WEDI Board of Directors and has served on the board for six years. He is also a member of the Oregon Prescription Drug Monitoring Program Advisory Commission.



Risk Management Essentials for the Laboratory 1.00 Online
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Description Learning Objectives Faculty
Most laboratory errors are not simply a matter of misjudgment. The potential for error accumulates with every person processing a specimen before it arrives in the lab for interpretation, and then in reporting results. This 1-hour webinar shows best communication practices with referring physicians, and strategies for mitigating risk. It also covers key factors leading to laboratory errors, and communication with patients after a medical error.

This course was planned and produced in accordance with the Accreditation Council of Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) criteria, with input from our pathology focus group, survey results from member pathologists, and claims data.
Following completion, you will be able to
  • Cite at least three key factors that lead to laboratory errors.
  • Describe strategies that mitigate risks in the laboratory.
  • List the elements of a complete informed consent document.
  • Describe three points of communication most important to patients after a medical error.



Pat McCotter
, RN, JD, CPHRM, CPC, is the Director of Facility Risk Management and Provider Support at Physicians Insurance in Seattle and teaches and consults with clinicians on a wide range of health care risk management issues. She is particularly interested in disclosure and apology as well as provider wellness issues.





Risk Management Tips for EMR 1.00 Online
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Description Learning Objectives Faculty
Practitioners will learn from real case examples how EMR can both improve documentation and create potential litigation traps for the unwary. We will also explore how electronic discovery in a malpractice lawsuit interacts with the EMR and how awareness of these interactions can help the provider reduce liability exposure.
Following this webinar, practitioners will be able to:
  • Describe how EMR is utilized in a malpractice lawsuit, both by plaintiff and by the defense.
  • Demonstrate strategies for using EMR to reduce liability risk.
  • List common EMR pitfalls in the litigation context.
  • Discuss the way electronic discovery impacts the development of the facts in a malpractice case.
Elizabeth A. Leedom, JD, Bennett Bigelow & Leedom, P.S.
Liz is an experienced trial lawyer who has represented hospitals, physicians, and other providers in medical malpractice cases for 28 years. She focuses on cases involving obstetrics, neurosurgery, breast cancer, and other areas. Liz has tried over 60 malpractice cases to verdict. She is regularly included on the Super Lawyers list by Washington Law and Politics magazine, is a Fellow of the American College of Trial Lawyers, and teaches medical malpractice law at the University of Washington School of Law.


Safeguarding Your Practice: Understanding the Final HIPAA-HITECH Rules 1.00 Online
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Description Learning Objectives Faculty
September 23, 2013, is the deadline when all hospitals, clinics, and practices must meet all requirements of the HIPAA Final Rule announced in January. Shortly thereafter, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) will begin audits to ensure that everyone meets their HIPAA obligations. This self-directed online learning module has been designed to address the federal government’s final rules on HIPAA privacy, security, and enforcement as well as the HITECH Act and the Breach Notification Rule.
At the conclusion of this self-directed e-learning activity, participants should be able to:
  • Review and discuss the final regulations issued on January 25, 2013, by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services as they affect ­
            - The HIPAA Privacy Rule ­
            - The HIPAA Security Rule ­
            - The HIPAA Enforcement Rule ­
            - The HITECH Act and the Breach Notification Rule
  • Describe what is and is not a “breach” of protected health information (PHI) according to the revised definition in the final rule 
  • List the required changes you must make to the content of your Business Associate Agreements 
  • Review and discuss the expanded definition of a “Business Associate” and the rules regarding subcontractors of the “Business Associate”  
  • Describe the new rules regarding fund-raising communications, marketing communications, and the sale of protected health information 
  • Describe the required revisions to your existing Notice of Privacy Practices 
  • List the enhanced civil and criminal penalties that can be applied
Leslie Meserole, JD, is a principal in the health care practice team of Riddell Williams. She has experience working with hospitals, public hospital districts, air ambulance providers, physician groups, and physicians in business transactions and regulatory compliance matters. Leslie received her BS degree in Business Administration from Vanderbilt University and her JD degree from Seattle University School of Law, summa cum laude.


Robert Y. Oikawa, MD, MPH, CISSP, CPPS, CPHQ, has focused on the information security and safety of health care information technology, especially regarding HIPAA security and privacy. He has been involved with health care, security, safety, and quality improvement throughout his career. He received his MD degree from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 1979, completing his medical residency and fellowships in biomedical engineering, cardiology, and interventional cardiology at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. After a stint in private practice of interventional cardiology, he returned to software engineering and served as principal consultant, senior program manager, and senior architect during a decade with the Microsoft Corporation and MSNBC, focusing on software and system architecture, information security, learning solution development, software engineering best practices, risk management, innovation, and intellectual property.


Septic Stone Management: a True Urologic Emergency 1.00 Online
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Description Learning Objectives Faculty
A 50-year-old mother of three presents to her primary care physician with increasingly severe left flank pain. By the end of the day she will have gone to the emergency room with worsening symptoms, and although effective treatment is begun by the following morning, it is too late to prevent an extensive hospital stay and multiple amputations. How might this patient’s sepsis have been recognized earlier, with better coordination among the physicians involved?
 
The incidence of sepsis is dramatically increasing, with infection a major source of mortality in stone disease. In this 1-hour webinar course, Dr. Glenn Preminger, Chief of Urology at Duke University, gives you a short checklist to keep “hot stones” on your radar, introduces a treatment algorithm, and demonstrates efficient multi-disciplinary communication.
At the conclusion of this webinar, participants will be able to:
  • Cite the signs and symptoms that indicate a ureteral stone patient with potential sepsis
  • Use the SIRS Criteria to identify systemic inflammatory response
  • Incorporate the Safety Checklist for Septic Stone Patients
Glenn Michael Preminger, MD, has received worldwide recognition for his contributions in Urology. In 2011, he became Chief of Urologic Surgery at Duke University and was named the James F. Glenn Professor of Urologic Surgery.
 
Dr. Preminger has published more than 350 manuscripts, 100 book chapters, and 9 books. He is a member of 15 professional societies and holds editorial positions with Urology, the Journal of Endourology, and Urological Research.
 
His clinical interests include the minimally invasive management of urinary tract stones, including shock wave lithotripsy and percutaneous and ureteroscopic stone removal. In addition, he coordinates the comprehensive metabolic evaluation and preventative medical treatment offered at the Duke Comprehensive Kidney Stone Center.


Shared Decision Making in Chronic Pain Management: Achieving Goals and Positive Health Outcomes 1.00 Online
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Description Learning Objectives Faculty
A 2011 Institute of Medicine panel concluded there are 100 million adults in the United States with chronic pain. Developing skills to navigate evolving pain care standards can make a big difference to your patients health, your professional satisfaction, and the needs of your medical community. One such skill, shared decision making, relates to having conversations with patients about care decisions. In pain care, discussions of likely outcomes, goals of therapy, and unexpected consequences of care decisions can be complicated by factors specific to chronic pain and opioids. Nevertheless, well-developed skills around shared decision making for pain care can reliably generate clinical encounters that are safe, productive, and satisfying. This one-hour e-learning module addresses the challenges of shared decision making from the standpoint of managing chronic pain.

This 1-hour e-learning module was planned and produced in accordance with the Accreditation Council of Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) Essentials. It includes reading material, online resources, and case examples that illustrate different approaches to collaborating with patients.
Following completion, you will be able to: 
• Consistently generate healthy goal-oriented conversations with patients.
• Engage patients in effective, prudent, and proactive management of pain.
• Orient and motivate patients towards positive health outcomes.
• Apply tools to appropriately balance patient preferences during a course of therapy against emerging risk indicators.
 
Michael Schiesser, MD, Internal Medicine, Bellevue
A widely accomplished and respected physician leader, Dr. Schiesser is a national expert in issues of pain care, addiction medicine, and evolving standards of care in clinical delivery involving controlled substances. His patient advocacy resulted in changes in Washington State law, state licensing commission rules, and a Pulitzer Prize-winning collaboration with the Seattle Times.
 
Dr. Schiesser has authored and delivered pain and addiction-related education to thousands of physicians across the United States. His areas of expertise include laboratory industry, regulatory policy, health administration, and legislative affairs. 


Social Determinants of Health: Neighborhood and Built Environment 1.00 Online
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Description
The physical environment in which individuals live has a direct impact on their health and wellness and on their ability to access healthcare. Healthy People 2020 identifies neighborhoods and the built environment as a pillar of the social determinants of health tied to health outcomes. This course provides an in-depth analysis of this pillar and how it affects the health and well-being of patient populations. You will learn about four components: access to healthy foods, quality of housing, crime and violence, and environmental conditions. You will also learn how to leverage this knowledge as a health care practitioner to improve treatment planning for your patients and, ultimately, their health outcomes. This course is the fifth in a five-part series of courses on the social determinants of health.


Social Media: Managing Patient Engagement and Professional Risk 1.00 Online
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Description Learning Objectives Faculty
As a profession, physicians have a significant interest in the potential applications of social media to patients and other clinicians. Health care professionals have an interest in online physician communities and patient communities. These forums may facilitate physician-patients interactions. While clinicians approve and see the benefit of electronic interactions with patients to improve access and quality of care, many are concerned about patient privacy, liability, and compensation for these activities. There has been limited policy or guidance on the best practices for the conduct of physician professionalism in the digital environment. Areas of specific concern include the use of such media for nonclinical purposes, implications for confidentiality, the use of social media in patient education, and how all of this affects the public's trust in the profession. As patient-physician interactions extend into the digital environment, this one-hour webinar was developed to help physicians balance the benefits of social media with the risks it can pose.
At the conclusion of this webinar, participants should be able to:
  • List online physician and patient health and wellness activities
  • Develop strategies for online patient engagement
  • Review and discuss current American College of Physicians (ACP) guidelines regarding engagement in social media
  • List two activities that can minimize social media risk


Kathy Ferris
, ARM, CPHRM, is a Healthcare Risk Management Consultant with Physicians Insurance. Working out of the Seattle office, Kathy provides risk management services to members from Bellingham to Olympia. She has been a part of the Physicians Insurance Risk Management Department since 1998, helping to meet member needs with information, advice, and guidance regarding health care risk management issues




David Kinard
 is an award-winning senior marketer with expertise in health care marketing, on/offline communications, and community development. He is a regular MBA faculty member and conference/keynote speaker and holds the Professional Certified Marketer credential. He currently serves as associate vice president of marketing & communications at Physicians Insurance.



Sports Concussions: Where Are We Now? 1.00 Online
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Description Learning Objectives Faculty
Sports related concussions remain a serious health condition, with as many as 3.8 million being reported in the United States each year, according to the Centers for Disease control and Prevention. Immediate recognition and management is critical. In this 1-hour webinar, Dr. Stanley Herring, Co-Medical Director of the Seattle Sports Concussion Program, will help bridge the gap in recognizing and managing traumatic brain injuries and help health care providers establish appropriate return-to-play guidelines for injured athletes.
At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:
  • List the acute signs and symptoms suggestive of concussion.
  • Cite the diagnostic criteria for second impact syndrome.
  • Use a standardized baseline assessment tool for concussion.
  • Assess for cognitive, somatic, and affective signs and symptoms of acute concussion.
  • Describe the elements of post-day evaluation and treatment.
  • Describe the five steps that athletes should be required to take before they return to play.
Stanley S. Herring, MD, is a clinical professor in the Departments of Rehabilitation Medicine, Orthopedics and Sports Medicine, and Neurological Surgery at the University of Washington. He is director of Sports, Spine, and Orthopedic Health for UW Medicine and co-medical director of the Seattle Sports Concussion Program, a partnership between UW Medicine and Seattle Children's. He specializes in non-operative musculoskeletal and sports medicine, with a particular interest in disorders of the spine and sports concussion.

Dr. Herring is a team physician for the Seattle Seahawks and Seattle Mariners and a consultant to the UW Sports Medicine Program and the Seattle Storm. He serves as a member of the NFL's Head, Neck and Spine Committee and was a major contributor to the successful passage of the Zackery Lystedt Law in Washington State. He is working to help pass similar legislation in all fifty states and the District of Columbia.



Stroke: Prevention and Treatment 1.00 Online
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Description

SUMMARY
Discussion of stroke including how it affects the body and how to recognize the symptoms, treatments, and stroke prevention strategies.



TeamSTEPPS: Tools and Strategies for the Emergency Department 1.00 Online
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Description Learning Objectives Faculty
From 1995 through 2005, the Joint Commission identified ineffective communication as the root cause for nearly 66% of all reported sentinel events, and from 2010 through 2013, it remained in the top three root causes of all sentinel events reported. Communication problems and information gaps among physicians, nurses, and other hospital departments are a primary cause of diagnostic errors in the emergency department and can result in disorganized care, delayed treatment, role confusion, and staff and patient dissatisfaction. All of these factors combine to create an unhealthy work environment and the potential for unsafe patient care.
 
In this 1-hour webinar, Dr. Hurley discusses the concepts of team training with a shared mental model culminating in enhanced physician and staff performance and patient safety.
At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:
 
  • Review the principles of effective communication.
  • Discuss strategies to improve interpersonal and inter-departmental communication and teamwork.
  • Identify departmental barriers and apply best practices to improve patient outcomes, safety, and satisfaction.
William Hurley, MD, FACEP is currently medical director of the Washington Poison Center, chief medical officer of Summit Pacific Medical Center, attending physician in the emergency department at Harborview Medical Center, and assistant clinical professor with the University of Washington School of Medicine. He completed his residency in emergency medicine at Madigan Army Medical Center and a fellowship in medical toxicology with the San Francisco Poison Center. He is board-certified in emergency medicine and medical toxicology and has been a practicing emergency physician and medical toxicologist for over 25 years. He helped to found and develop the University of Washington TeamSTEPPS® National Training Program and has been active in the study and teaching of teamwork skills to improve patient safety since 1993.


Teamwork, Communication, and Patient Safety in the Emergency Department: Case Studies 1.00 Online
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Description Learning Objectives Faculty
As an emergency physician, you operate under great time pressure within a high-risk, high-volume environment. This self-study course will help you mitigate the risk by using evidence-based communication tools. The course demonstrates through case examples how to put the tools into practice, facilitate team effectiveness, and enhance patient safety. An interactive quiz at the end of each case reinforces key topics discussed throughout the course.
At the conclusion of this self-directed e-learning activity, participants should be able to:
  • Discuss ways that communication affected the patient outcome in each case.
  • Evaluate the patient care in terms of best practice and patient safety.
  • Cite a lesson from these cases that you will apply.
Dr. William Hurley is currently medical director of the Washington Poison Center, chief medical officer of Summit Pacific Medical Center, attending physician in the emergency department at Harborview Medical Center, and assistant clinical professor with the University of Washington School of Medicine. He completed his residency in emergency medicine at Madigan Army Medical Center and a fellowship in medical toxicology with the San Francisco Poison Center. He is board-certified in emergency medicine and medical toxicology and has been a practicing emergency physician and medical toxicologist for over 25 years. He helped to found and develop the University of Washington TeamSTEPPS National Training Program and has been active in the study and teaching of teamwork skills to improve patient safety since 1993.


Test New Course 1.00 Online
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The Future is Now: How Physicians Can Thrive through the Transformation of Health Care Delivery 1.00 Online
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Description Learning Objectives Faculty
Physicians who understand the ramifications of medicine’s rapidly-changing practice standards will be better prepared and have a tremendous advantage over their colleagues who are not. With financial compensation tied to quality measures and patient satisfaction, physicians are stressed for time and tools to implement all that is being asked of them. Patient safety pioneer John Nance discusses the substantial steps you can take now to thrive in the new delivery system that is based on value and population health. Learn how you can benefit from this pivotal opportunity to improve your professional practice and satisfaction scores!
At the conclusion of this activity, participants will be able to:
  • Cite the challenges they face in transitioning from a fee-for-service model to a value-based, population health-oriented system of care
  • List the strategies they will use to improve teamwork and care coordination
  • Describe key drivers of changes in physician culture that will promote accountability
John Nance, JD - One of the key thought leaders to emerge in American Healthcare in the past decade, John J. Nance brings a rich and varied professional background to the task of helping doctors, administrators, boards, and front-line staff alike survive and prosper during the most profoundly challenging upheaval in the history of modern medicine.  Having helped pioneer the Renaissance in patient safety as one of the founders of the National Patient Safety Foundation in 1997, his efforts (and health care publications) are dedicated to transforming American health care from a reactive stance to an effective and safe system of prevention and wellness.


The Medical Quality Assurance Commission Pain Rules: What Washington State Physicians Need to Know... and All Prescribing Physicians Will Benefit From 1.00 Online
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Description Learning Objectives Faculty
The National Institute on Drug Abuse reported in April 2014 that unintentional deaths from prescription pain relievers continue to soar, having more than quadrupled since 1999. In response to this public health emergency, the Washington state legislature passed Engrossed Substitute House Bill 2876, to guide prescribers of opioids towards safer treatment practices.
  
This 1-hour e-learning module will guide you through the pain rules, provide practical suggestions on how to assimilate opioid-prescribing best practices, and point you to resources for delivering safe, effective care to patients with chronic, non-cancer pain.

While the rules pertain to Washington State prescribers, Physicians Insurance recommends the guidance provided by the rules to all physicians who prescribe opiate medication, as well as affiliated providers involved with management of patients with chronic pain.
At the conclusion of this educational activity, participants will be able to:
  • Summarize the rules required for treatment of chronic, non-cancer pain in Washington State.
  • Identify which of their patients are in need of specialty consultation, and develop a protocol for consultation.
  • Cite specific practice changes they will make to comply with the rules.
Michael Schiesser, MD, Internal Medicine and Addiction Medicine, Woodinville, is a widely accomplished and respected physician leader. He is a national expert in issues of pain care, addiction medicine, and evolving standards of care in clinical delivery involving controlled substances. His patient advocacy resulted in changes in Washington State law, state licensing commission rules, and a Pulitzer Prize-winning collaboration with the Seattle Times.
 
Dr. Schiesser has authored and delivered pain and addiction-related education to thousands of physicians across the United States. His areas of expertise include laboratory industry, regulatory policy, health administration, and legislative affairs. 


Transitioning Care in the Face of Painkiller Addiction or Abuse 1.00 Online
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Description Learning Objectives Faculty
“I’ll be going out of town next week,” says Mrs. Johnson, “so I’m hoping you can refill my prescription today.” Mrs. Johnson is a long-term patient whom you trust, but this is her second request for an early refill of oxycodone. How should you evaluate her request in light of the 16,000 unintended deaths each year from prescription opioid analgesics?
 
Every touch point with a patient is an opportunity to consider risks of opioid therapy and to realign management towards best health outcomes. This one-hour webinar offers an ethical framework for evaluation that will also help you to engage patients in conversations that build partnership. You’ll hear examples of dialogue that squarely addresses high-risk situations and options for tapering or alternative treatment.
At the conclusion of this webinar, participants will be able to:
  • Identify patients managed with pain medications who may require a transition in their management.
  • Communicate the basis for their assessment to the patient, and document the discussion.
  • Outline and implement a management plan for ongoing patient care.
Michael Schiesser, MD, Internal Medicine, Bellevue, is a widely accomplished and respected physician leader. He is a national expert in issues of pain care, addiction medicine, and evolving standards of care in clinical delivery involving controlled substances. His patient advocacy resulted in changes in Washington State Law, State licensing commission rules, and a Pulitzer Prize winning collaboration with the Seattle Times.
 
Dr. Schiesser has authored and delivered pain and addiction related education to thousands of physicians across the United States. His areas of expertise include laboratory industry, regulatory policy, health administration, and legislative affairs.



Treating the Opiate Epidemic 1.00 Online
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Description
The webinar will cover buprenorphine and its clinical use in much more detail including short and long term outcomes. It will also cover psychosocial interventions to be used with these medications and emphasize the need for more buprenorphine prescribers.


Ureteroscopic Surgery for Stones: How to Avoid or Manage Complications 1.25 Online
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Description Learning Objectives Faculty
You are beginning a ureteroscopy on a male patient with a 6mm impacted mid-ureteral calculus when unexpectedly, you encounter difficulty in gaining access proximal to the stone.  Do you know all of your options at this critical point?
 
 Access to the ureter, impacted stones, and careful follow up of complicated cases are paramount to resolving ureteral calculi and to preventing the loss of renal units. In this webinar, Dr. Gerhard Fuchs, an internationally recognized expert in the treatment of stone disease, reviews his safe and proven techniques in the treatment of renal and ureteral calculi.  Through illustrations and case examples he discusses safe access to the ureter, how to negotiate impacted stones, treatment of renal pathology, and how to manage complications when they occur.
Urologists who complete this course will be able to:
  1. Access the ureteral site of pathology while minimizing traumatic risks to the ureter.
  2. Describe the process for selecting the appropriate equipment that will also be cost effective in stone treatment.
  3. Explain how they determine when to refer patients to tertiary level expert intervention.
  4. Image patients appropriately postoperatively based on their original pathology and extent of surgical intervention.
Gerhard J. Fuchs, MD, is Professor of Clinical Urology and Executive Director of the University of Southern California Institute of Urology in Beverly Hills.  He also serves as Director, Center of Men’s Health, Director of Education, and Director of Quality Assurance at the USC Institute of Urology. An internationally renowned surgeon, researcher, and educator with nearly 30 years of experience, Dr. Gerhard J. Fuchs specializes in minimally invasive procedures for treating kidney stones, advanced endoscopic, and urologic laparoscopic surgery. He is Board Certified through the American and German Boards of Urology, and is a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons.


VBAC Revisited: Avoiding the Swinging Pendulum 1.25 Online
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Description Learning Objectives Faculty
The risks and benefits of VBAC present a complex challenge. Pressures to lower cesarean rates run headlong into the question of whether prompt operative intervention can be guaranteed in an emergency. The reconsideration of previously-established guidelines and appeals from natural childbirth advocates add to the complexity, especially as acceptable risk differs from patient to patient.
 
How should you counsel women about trial of labor after cesarean?
How should you manage their labor?
 
In this 1.25 hour webinar, obstetrical leader Dr. Steven L. Clark will address these questions through a reasoned approach to VBAC based on careful patient selection and a focus on patient safety.
Participants will leave this activity able to:
  • Implement careful pre-labor stratification of women considering VBAC.
  • Use predicted success rates and medical evidence to counsel prenatal patients with a prior cesarean birth.
  • Ensure immediate availability of emergency operative intervention for patients undergoing trial of labor after cesarean.
Steven L. Clark, M.D. is a maternal-fetal medicine specialist and is professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. He was formerly Medical Director of Women’s and Children’s Clinical Services for the Hospital Corporation of America. He has served as president of the Society for Maternal Fetal Medicine, Chair of the ACOG Technical Bulletin Committee and as a board examiner. He has served on several ACOG task forces and committees and as patient safety consultant to the U.S. Air Force Surgeon General. He currently serves on the Scientific Advisory Board for United Health Care, and on the Joint Commission Perinatal Advisory Panel. He has published over 200 scientific articles and chapters, and edited several textbooks, including Critical Care Obstetrics. He serves as a peer reviewer for 23 national and international scientific journals.


Vital Signs: Role in Saving Patient Lives from Sepsis 1.00 Online
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Description

SUMMARY

Discusses the importance of vital signs to detect clinical deterioration of a patient, and their relevance to clinical practice; identifying at-risk and septic patients through respiratory rate, as well as other vital signs; recognizing the clinical presentation and detection of sepsis with the use of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria; and the proper methods of obtaining vital signs.



Working with Difficult People 1.00 Online
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Description
There are a lot reasons that it can be difficult working with certain people. There may be communication breakdowns, personality clashes, or conflicting work habits. You may not like everyone you work with, but you do have to respect everyone. By learning ways to reduce conflicts, you’ll become more respected too. In this course, you’ll learn strategies to calmly address misunderstandings before they blow up. Professional relationships can improve when you know how to deal with differences, communicate clearly, and listen respectfully.


Workplace Violence Prevention 1.00 Online
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Description
This webinar will help participants develop a secure workplace by looking at the environmental, procedural and personal dynamic that lead to workplace violence. The whole continuum along the workplace violence scale will begin with a discussion on Active Shooter response protocols to increase chances of survival in case of an event. Threat assessment protocols will be reviewed to help management assess a particular risk and implement a range of security measures while an overall review of policies, technology controls and worker attitudes will determine the organization’s preparedness. In addition, participants will learn techniques on the de-escalation of hostile behavior and how to address Domestic Violence in the workplace.





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